Underage Drinking

Underage Drinking Statistics

One in six teens binge drinks, yet only 1 in 100 parents believe his or her teen binge drinks.

Institute of Medicine National Research Council of the National Academies. Bonnie, Richard J. and Mary Ellen O’Connell, eds. Reducing Underage Drinking: A Collective Responsibility. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2003.

Teen alcohol use kills 4,700 people each year – that’s more than all illegal drugs combined.

Hingson, Ralph and D. Kenkel. “Social and Health Consequences of Underage Drinking.” In press. As quoted in Institute of Medicine National Research Council of the National Academies. Bonnie, Richard J. and Mary Ellen O’Connell, eds. Reducing Underage Drinking: A Collective Responsibility. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2003.

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens, and about a quarter of those crashes involve an underage drinking driver.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2011: Overview”. Washington DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2013. and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “Traffic Safety Facts 2011: Young Drivers”. Washington DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2013.

Kids who start drinking young are seven times more likely to be in an alcohol-related crash.

Hingson, Ralph, et al. “Age of Drinking Onset, Driving After Drinking, and Involvement in Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crashes.” DOT HS 809 188. Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, January 2001.

High school students who use alcohol or other substances are five times more likely to drop out of school.

National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Volume 1: Secondary School Students”, National Survey Results on Drug Use from The Monitoring the Future Study, 1975-1997. Rockville, MD: Department of Health and Human Services, 1998.

Almost half of all 10th graders drink alcohol.

Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2013). Monitoring the Future national survey results on drug use, 1975-2012. Volume I: Secondary school students. Ann Arbor: Institute for Social Research, The University of Michigan, 604 pp.

– See more at: http://www.madd.org/underage-drinking/underage-drinking-statistics.html#sthash.rLKYQku7.dpuf

Forum On Underage Drinking

Masuk High School and ADAM (Alcohol and Drug Awareness of Monroe) will be hosting a “Forum on Underage Drinking” for ninth grade students accompanied by one parent or guardian due to space limitations, 7 – 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 12th in the Masuk auditorium. The program explores school, community and legislative strategies to address underage drinking among teens. Student attendance fulfills a component of the ninth grade health curriculum.

 

A Guide For Parents

Create an environment where underage drinking is not acceptable so teens can avoid illegal or dangerous situations.
Know that you are the biggest single influence on whether or not your teen drinks.
Talk early and often with your teen about the physical, emotional and social consequences of underage drinking.
Be a positive role model.
Teach your teen to choose friends wisely.
Monitor your teen’s activities.
Set clear rules discouraging drinking and enforce consequences.
Work with your child to decide on refusal and exit strategies.
Secure all alcohol in your home.
Talk to other parents about your rules and expectations.

For Teens and Parents

For more in depth information on Alcohol and Underage Drinking including drugs of abuse,  please go to http://www.abovetheinfluence.com.

Need Help, Have Questions, Have Concerns about Yourself, A Family Member or Friend?  Please note the following individuals are here to help!

Monroe Police Department: 203-452-2831
Detective Kelly McFarland, Youth Officer and Family Assistance Coordinator x1212

Masuk High School: 203-452-5823
Pupil Services: x7751
Matthew Curry, Student Assistance Counselor x7748
Officer Danielle Boucher, School Resource Officer x7047

Town of Monroe: Department of Community and Social Services 203-452-2800